You’ve got a friend…on the dusty horse behind you

Got another radio quiz for you, this time on sidekicks.

Huh. Just learned something: the word “sidekick” originated in the pickpocketing trade. It referred to the front side pocket of a pair of pants, supposedly the hardest pocket to pick. Somehow that morphed into a synonym for “dependable friend.” And so doeth “Our Crazy Old English Language” evolve.

Can you imagine us Years from today, Sharing a park bench quietly? How terribly strange To be seventy. Old friends, Memory brushes the same years, Silently sharing the same fear... --Paul Simon, "Old Friends"

Can you imagine us
Years from today,
Sharing a park bench quietly?
How terribly strange
To be seventy.
Old friends,
Memory brushes the same years,
Silently sharing the same fear…
–Paul Simon, “Old Friends”

The sidekick was an important element of radio adventure shows, too, as he or she provided a means for the writer to describe the action without having to disturb the narrator (no doubt down the hall in the announcers’ lounge, his hand cupped behind his ear, practicing his “hey, fellas and gals…”). “Mr. Dillon, they’re headed for the Long Branch,” tells you and Mr. Dillon what you both need to know.

The sidekick was also a device to find out what the hero was thinking. Consider the shows where there was no sidekick: Superman had only himself to talk to whenever he put on the cape and union suit; Sgt. Preston could talk to King, but his cold-nosed companion only yipped in response. (Superman in particular should have raised the eyebrow of any eavesdropping mental health professional.)

I’ve often wondered what role the sidekick played in less dramatic, day-to-day moments. Perhaps they also handled the ops side of the business, setting up gigs, arranging for hay deliveries, making sure the local saloon stocked the star’s favorite rye. Maybe they acted as business manager: “Hey, Keemosabe, what’s this entry for $200 under Client Relations”?

So, here’s the quiz, then. Below are the sidekicks—who are their respective principals? E.g., who was the “Simon” to Kato’s “Garfunkel”? The “Hall” to Jingles’s “Oates”?

1. Tonto
2. Chester
3. Little Beaver
4. California
5. Margo Lane
6. Kato
7. Jingles
8. Mike Clancy
9. Cadet Happy
10. Dr. Watson
11. Pancho
12. (Although from a comedy) a classic wingman: Frankie Remley

And since I’ve raised the topic of pocket picking:  A few years ago I had an unfortunate short course in the subject while visiting Portugal. Here’s how I subsequently described it for the Los Angeles Times and Newark Star-Ledger:

The little trolleys are just so cute that they almost make me forget the only negative experience of our trip: I got robbed. Tram No. 28 is recommended in the guidebooks as a charming way to ride through the old neighborhoods and to the Saturday flea market (“Feira da Ladra”). So my wife and I boarded the crowded tram on Saturday morning, heading for the flea market.

Had I not been the victim and instead been watching the episode as a member of an audience, I would have applauded the sheer artistry of the pickpockets. My wife and I got separated in the crowd. Someone brushed my camera and the lens cap fell to the floor. (Bravo!) I searched the floor, which was difficult to do while hanging onto the overhead straps as the trolley climbed the steep São Jorge Hill and swung abruptly around its sharp corners. Two middle-aged guys kept jostling me as they disagreed over which of them should take the one empty seat next to me. Then they were gone—and so was my wallet. (Encore! Author, author!)

I can report that Lisbon police are polite, sympathetic and that they helped us contact our credit card companies to report the theft. And they gave us advice that was echoed by our hotel’s concierge and other locals: Oh, you have to be careful on Tram 28—it’s notorious for pickpockets. Ahem, the guidebooks might have pointed that out in their catalog of Tram 28’s charms. (Did I mention that Feira da Ladra literally means “thieves’ market”?)

I add that the wallet was in a front pocket. The guys were that good.

It couldn’t be that my sidekick let me down.
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And now four friends, walkin’ down the street, getting the funniest looks from ev’ry one they meet:

Evermore, the ultimate "wing man."

Evermore, the ultimate “wing man.”

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Oh, for Evermore…..

I haven’t been blogging in about half a year. I’ve got excuses, none of them worth your consideration. But one thing contributing to my procrastination was the continued hits the blog has been getting, even without any new posts. (How do I know that? I get statistics every day giving me the number of “views” and “likes” and where those viewers and likers might come from–France and Brazil and…. Oh, don’t worry—there’s no specific personal data there, nothing to breech your privacy rights.) (Although, I agree, you should tell that ex-boyfriend of yours to take a hike. And, have I mentioned reverse mortgages?)

I attribute the continued popularity to this guy:

How could anyone resist this bird, the little avian gargoyle we put at the end of our blogposts? He’s got a name, by the way: We named him “Evermore,” first, as a counterweight to all the sinister freight that vaguely raven-like birds have to carry. And also because “Oh, for evermore” was an expression of exasperation, delight or innocent wonder often voiced by one of the most beloved characters in broadcasting history, Chester from radio’s (i.e., the real) “Gunsmoke.” (He was portrayed by Parley Baer, who later was also the voice of the Keebler elf.)

One question, though: What kind of bird is Evermore? The picture was taken on a January day on a ferry going across the Bosporus from one side of Istanbul to the other, if that’s any help. Anyone got any ideas? So we don’t have to say, “Quoth the [insert species here], ‘Evermore.’” Which might get him laughed out of his exaltation, murmuration, murder, bouquet or, heaven forbid, unkindness.

Here’s a song, completely without relevance to the foregoing, but which never fails to make me happy.

Actually is much more comfortable down here, out of the spotlight.

Actually is much more comfortable down here, out of the spotlight.

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Of course, of course

Busy, lots to do. Only have time to spill a ten-gallon hatful* of radio, TV or western movie lore questions. It’s another memory quiz for ya, buckaroos, just to keep the mind active. A spritz of WD-40 for the mental gears.
IMG_2514_2
Let’s see if you can match the horse with its owner.

The rides:

1. Trigger
2. Champion
3. Silver
4. Buckshot
5. Diablo
6. Target
7. Tony
8. Scout
9. Buttermilk
10. Papoose
11. Topper
12. Thunder

The riders:

A. Red Ryder
B. Tonto
C. Roy
D. Hoppy
E. Little Beaver
F. Cisco
G. Gene
H. Tom
I. Annie
J. Lone Ranger
K. Dale
L. Wild Bill

________________________

*For you international readers, that would be a 37.85-liter hat.

In the course of looking for some horsey songs, I stumbled on this:

Which makes me happy. But on my way to finding that, I also found this:

Which, because it also has Chet in it, makes it an even greater day.

Hasn't seen a western movie since all the drive-ins closed.   (Particularly misses the popcorn.)

Hasn’t seen a western movie since all the drive-ins closed.
(Particularly misses the popcorn.)

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Anaheim, Azusa and Cuc….amonga

Another quiz, this time from the glory days of network radio drama. One of the joys of listening to The Theatre* of the Mind, was getting to know the catchphrases associated with recurring characters. Regular listeners often could predict what a given character would say next, but if the writers were deft, this became a comfort rather than a distraction.

Interesting landscape.  Look closely and you can see Dodge City,  221B Baker St., Madison High School, Broadway (my beat) and 79 Wistful Vista. _______________ National Capital Radio & Television Museum Bowie, Md.

Interesting landscape. Look closely and you can see Dodge City,
221B Baker St., Madison High School, Broadway (my beat) and 79 Wistful Vista.
_______________
National Capital Radio & Television Museum
Bowie, Md.

So, who said the following? On which program?

1. Well, now, I wouldn’t say that….

2. What a revoltin’ development this is.

3. Is that you, Myrt?

4. Where the elite meet to eat.

5. I believe that’s our ring.

6. That’s pretty good, Johnny, but that ain’t the way I heered it.

7. I’ll mow ya down!

8. Well, King, this case is closed.

9. It’s a chancy job, and it makes a man watchful.

10. The weed of crime bears bitter fruit.

11. Rishigan Fishigan from Sishigan, Michigan.**

12. Who is buried in Grant’s tomb?
______________________________
* A Canadian station, receivable in my area on clear nights, used to run the old shows as part of what it pronounced the “Theeder of the Mind.” And currently there’s an internet station based in Oklahoma that refers to itself as the “Radio Thee-ate-er Channel.” We former drama majors know, of course, that the word is pronounced “thee-a-tuh.”
And that the word is spelled with an “re,” not an “er.” But, no, we don’t extend our pinkies while sipping our Lapsang Souchong.

**One of many from a show that was nearly solid catchphrases from beginning to end. And a favorite of my Dad.
______________________________
Radio, someone still loves you:

(I don’t remember our radio flashing like that.  Someone needs to gather up the tubes and take them down to the tube tester at the corner Rexall.  Quick!)

Once tried to hatch the local oscillator tube from a Zenith.

Once tried to hatch the local oscillator tube from a Zenith.

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Your daddy’s rich, mama’s good lookin’, and you’re on the teevee

Remember Tom Swifties? The concept, which I recall from about 1964, was based on Victor Appleton’s Tom Swift stories, where no one could just say anything, they had to say it with an adverb: not just “said,” but “said longingly” or “angrily” or “quickly” or (ahem) “Swiftly.” This led to rampant punning, yielding inventions such as “‘Please, fellows, turn that furnace down!’ said Tom hotly.” Or the Swifty my sister formulated, “‘Hmmph, fine president I turned out to be,’ said Calvin coolishly.” (She always was the bright one.) Or this, which I just found on Wikipedia: “‘I have no flowers,’ Tom said lackadaisically.” There was a whole book of Tom Swifties back then and even today there are still Internet sites full of them. (Of course there would be. Nothing ever dies; it just goes to live on the Web.)

So, anyway, “It’s time for another TV show memory test,” said Brainpickles Guy quizzically. Not theme songs this time, but sitcom families. Match the kids in the first list with the parents in the second.

Okay, big family reunion smile now.  Big smile...smile?   (Plaster birds are so serious)

Okay, big family reunion smile now. Big smile…smile?
(Plaster birds are so serious)

The kids
A. Richie
B. Bess
C. Theodore, Wally
D. Pugsley, Wednesday
E. Kelly
F. Little Ricky
G. Eddie, Marilyn
H. Kathy, Bud, Betty
I. Opie
J. Cissy, Jody, Buffy
K. Ricky*, David
L. Marcia, Jan, Cindy, Greg, Peter, Bobby

The parents
1. Morticia, Gomez
2. Andy
3. Harriet, Ozzie
4. Carol, Mike
5. June, Ward
6. Lucy, Ricky
7. Bentley
8. Lily, Herman
9. Phyllis
10. Laura, Rob
11. Uncle Bill, Mr. French
12. Margaret, Jim

——————-
*His real first name was “Eric.” Never knew that.

What we need here is some good Johnny Cash parentin’ music:

Who were all those young people?  And where can I get a shirt like that?

Word play is the lowest form of humor, said Tom punitively.

Word play is the lowest form of humor, said Tom punitively.

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Not bad, just misunderstood

Another quiz for you as 2014 sneaks out the back door: Not a test on TV show theme songs, but on TV kid show villains. Sneering, cheating, black-hatting their way into our youthful view of the world. TV wouldn’t have been the same without them.

Do you remember when TV stations signed off the air at night?  And when they returned they often aired something like this while they warmed up the gizmos and sobered up the talent.   Why not take the quiz below while you wait for the Morning Farm Report. __________________ National Capital Radio & TV Museum, Bowie, Md.

Do you remember when TV stations signed off the air at night? And when they returned they often aired something like this while they warmed up the gizmos and sobered up the talent.
Why not take the quiz below while you wait for the Morning Farm Report.
__________________
National Capital Radio & TV Museum, Bowie, Md.

Can you identify the heroes that match the following nemesises nemini neminae bad guys?

1. Snidely Whiplash

2. Phineas T. Bluster

3. Butch Cavendish

4. Crabby Appleton

5. Boris & Natasha

6. Sheriff of Nottingham

7. Bluto

8. Dudley Nightshade

9. Ming the Merciless

10. Froggy the Gremlin

11. Simon Bar Sinister

And, actually from a commercial,

12. D. K. Germ.

Let’s give ‘em a big round of boo-hiss! (Ever notice that the villains were far more interesting than their hero counterparts?)

There were many more bad guys, of course, but most shows relied on a succession of guest-star villains, who did their dastardly deeds, got caught and exited stage left—all in one episode. The thirteen malefactors above were not so easily vanquished. They were professional baddies, the kind of people who put “Villain” in their Facebook profiles (and very rarely get any “Like”s).

They have a point of view, too, though:

(And we can’t let this moment pass without acknowledging a charming mondegreen originating with our niece, Sarah, who thought it was “I fought the dog and the dog won.”)  (Well, ya had to know the dog.)

Points out that you've let the birdbath freeze over again.  But wishes you a Happy New Year anyway.

Points out that you’ve let the birdbath freeze over again. But wishes you a Happy New Year anyway.

 

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Rhymes with “tickle”

You know what this world needs? A good pickle song.

Oh, you say, how about “Pickle in the Middle,” often heard on Mom’s Kitchen Radio, that excellent online audio streaming service whose handy icon is over there in the right hand margin, not that we’re shamelessly plugging it or anything?

“This picture makes no sense, you know.” “True, but how many other blogs are hiring gargoyles for modeling gigs?”

“This picture makes no sense, you know.”
“True, but how many other blogs are hiring gargoyles for modeling gigs?”

Yeah, there’s a pickle in the title, but the song is really about hot dogs. “I can gobble hot dogs until I drop; with a pickle in the middle and the mustard on top.” The song was originated on Jack Benny’s radio show by Artie Auerbach  in the character of hot dog vendor Mr. Kitzel (“hoo-hoo-hooo…!”). MKR plays the Louis Prima version.

You might also be aware of Teresa Brewer’s “Pickle Up a Doodle.” Alas, the only pickle is in the nonsense lyrics picked up in title, as the song itself concerns the devil’s courtship of a woman who decided that her only alternative to life as an old maid was to marry him. (This was before online dating.)

MKR also plays “Dill Pickle Rag,” by one Chester B. Atkins, a tune I like a lot. But it’s an instrumental.

A few other songs make pickle allusions.

1. Frank Sinatra’s “The Coffee Song (They’ve Got an Awful Lot of Coffee in Brazil),” an ode to coffee marketing, pushes the frontiers of pickle cuisine in that country:

And when their ham and eggs need savor,
Coffee ketchup gives ’em flavor.
Coffee pickles way outsell the dill.
Why, they put coffee in the coffee in Brazil.

(Not clear on how one pickles coffee.)

2.  There’s “Cheeseburger in Paradise”:

I like mine with lettuce and tomato,
Heinz 57 and French fried potato,
Big kosher pickle and a cold draft beer,
Well, good god almighty, which way do I steer?

I certainly can appreciate Jimmy Buffet’s effort—notice, he doesn’t dismiss the pickle as a mere condiment, but puts it in the same line with the beer.  Again, though, that’s still not the starring role it deserves.

3.  And  “Chewing Gum,” sung by Ella Fitzgerald, for another example:

My mama gave me a nickel
To buy a pickle.
I didn’t want a pickle,
So I bought some chewing gum.

But that seems to disparage the pickle, doesn’t it.

4.  Cole Porter, on the other hand, uses the pickle as one of many examples of devastating loss in “A Picture of Me without You”:

Picture Paul Revere without a horse.
Picture love in Hollywood without divorce.
Picture Barbara Hutton without a nickel.
Picture poor Mister Heinz, my dear, without a pickle.

One of the problems is the limited inventory of good rhymes. “There’s “nickel,” obviously, “fickle,” and the first Secretary of the Interior in the Nixon Administration, Wally Hickel.  And, and…. And then the list kinda runs out.

But see also…

5.  Arlo Guthrie:

I don’t want a pickle.
Just want to ride my motorcycle.

Now, the epic recitation that follows surely puts Arlo in the same league with Virgil and Homer (weren’t they on “Lum ‘n Abner”?), but ya can’t dance to a recitation.

Wait a minute….. What? You say that there, in my home state, they have a singing commercial for a pickle?

Well, it’s a start.

(If you go to their website, it appears that Gedney makes sweet pickles with sugar rather than HFCS, which, as you may be aware, is one of my preoccupations. I had not known that. They also sell them under other labels, including DelMonte, but none of them are available in my area.  However, ahem, if any of my Minnesota relatives are thinking of getting me something for Christmas….)

Meanwhile, perhaps we could rework a song made popular in the sixties by both The Drifters and Jay and the Americans: “This,” um, “Vlasic Moment.”

Is thinking “hoo-hoo-hooo” could be the right birdcall for him.

Is thinking “hoo-hoo-hooo” could be the right birdcall for him.

Posted in Food and Drink, Media, Music | Tagged , | 1 Comment

How sweet (and additive-free) it is

Attentive readers of this blog may have noticed that there’s been a long time between pickle posts, a regrettable lapse for a blog that celebrates pickles in its very name. Mostly that’s been because I have just been re-executing pickle recipes I’ve used and posted before. But this month I ventured into the crafting of sweet pickles and gherkins.
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I was forced into it. Being the lazy sort, I’d prefer to get my sweet pickles from the supermarket after someone else has done all the work. But the big pickle packers started replacing sugar with high fructose corn syrup. What is this stuff? Is it a food? I mean, have you ever seen HFCS on the grocery store shelves? Somewhere between the molasses and the pancake syrup? You, neither, huh. (Although, in all fairness, I’ve never seen raw gherkins in a supermarket either.)

My HFCS paranoia caused me to reject one sweet pickle brand after another. As of about two years ago, I was down to just one real-sugar brand from a small producer whose pickles I could find in only one store, the legendary A. Litteri’s Italian market in northeast DC. And suddenly those were gone, too.

The farmers markets didn’t have them; those little places that smell of bayberry and sell cutesy housewares and pseudo-home cooking put up in Mason jars didn’t have them either. And before someone mentions Sechler’s, yes, that estimable Hoosier pickle packer does indeed use sugar. Indeed, I think they got all the sugar the other guys gave up. Sechler sweet pickles are excellent, but so sweet that I think they could be wrapped in foil and left on hotel pillows when the maid turns down your bed. And they’re not available in this area except by mail order.

I know that some of the big guys make “no sugar added” sweet pickles, thus confusing things further. (It’s not like cucumbers have a ton of natural sweetness.) While there’s no HFCS in these, the sugar has been replaced instead by Sucralose. Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer choice of paranoias.

Thus having no alternative, I made my own. I used this recipe first to make sweet gherkins because it happened that we had gherkins growing in our back yard. At least I think we had gherkins (the terminology is unclear to me). Actually, what we had was a bunch of baby cucumbers that, with the imminent arrival of fall weather, had run out of time to grow further. There were two options, as we saw it: pickles or mulch.

The recipe assumes you have five quarts of gherkins. We had a half pint. So that means we had to reduce the quantity of the various ingredients by … (let’s see … two pints in a quart … carry the seven … square root of the hippopotamus…) nineteen 20ths!

Okay, how much is 1/20th of 3/4th teaspoon of turmeric? (And does anyone ever pronounce the first “R” in “turmeric”?) So, I simply guessed. I figured it’s not an exact science, anyway, particularly when one of the ingredients is “pickling spices,” the composition of which can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. I didn’t include the two optional ingredients, fennel seed and vanilla extract. (Vanilla in pickles? Did a stray line from a dessert recipe fall into this one? Jeez, why not coconut?)

If you analyze the recipe, you’ll see that it calls for a four-day process. I started things too late, right before we were to make a family pilgrimage to Minnesota, and had to compress the last two days into one. After I poured the vinegar-sugar-spice mixture over the little guys, I sampled a couple of them and was unimpressed. Yeah, I thought, better as mulch. But since we had to leave anyway, they might as well luxuriate in their marinade for a week while we were gone. (I never put up my pickles in the traditional hot-water bath, wait for the lids to pop method, preferring the ease of refrigerator pickles. So I just skipped the last step.)

Thus they sat in the fridge for eight days, and, when we got back, I hesitantly tried one. [Cue dramatic suspense music.]

It. Wasn’t. Bad!

Neither was the next one, nor the four or five after that!

We also had some larger, cigar-size cukes, so, encouraged by the gherkin experience, I tried the same compressed recipe with them. I added some sweet mini-bell peppers to the cukes and put a handful of pearl onions into the marinade. After only a couple of days of marinating they had turned into something I would be unashamed to serve to a demanding pickle-phile. They have a satisfying crunch and a nice balance of sweet-salty-sour-spicy.

There’s only one way to celebrate an accomplishment so momentous: We dance!

(Makes you want to take concertina lessons, don’t it.)

Hasn't eaten a pickle since he failed his audition to be the next Vlasic stork.

Hasn’t eaten a pickle since he failed his audition to be the next Vlasic stork.

Posted in Cooking, Food and Drink, Pickles | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

What would we do, Baby, without us?

Ah, Memorial Day….  Unofficial start of Summer, gateway to months of relaxation, good weather, picnics and, from the garden, fresh foo….

WHAT?  October?

Oc-bleepin’-tober?!  Wasn’t Memorial Day just yesterday?  How the heck did that happen?

Sad to say, the autumnal equinox is past, the stores already are selling Christmas decorations, and if you haven’t bought your Halloween candy yet, you’re hopelessly behind and apparently have lost control.

Regain a measure of your self-respect by completing another of our TV  theme quizzes.  Identify the shows, based on the snippets below from their theme songs.

Not quite sure what's going to come out of this:  Howdy Doody or clean socks. __________________ National Capital Radio & TV Museum, Bowie, Md.

Not quite sure what’s going to come out of this: Howdy Doody or clean socks.
__________________
National Capital Radio & TV Museum, Bowie, Md.

Let’s begin:

1. What would you do if I sang out of tune?
Would you stand up and walk out on me?

2. Long tails and ears for hats!
Guitars and sharps and flats!
Neat, sweet, a groovy song;
You’re invited—come along!

3. This is it, this is it—
This is life, the one you get, so go and have a ball.
This is it, this is it—
Straight ahead, and rest assured you can’t be sure at all.

4. All the world’s waiting for you
and the power you possess.
In your satin tights,
Fightin’ for your rights
And the old Red, White and Blue….

5. Yippee yaye-oh-kye-aye,
Gallopin’ all the way;
Great big star on his chest;
Outdraws all of the rest;
Fastest gun in the west!

6. I don’t need you to worry for me ‘cause I’m all right.
I don’t want you to tell me it’s time to come home.
I don’t care what you say anymore, this is my life.
Go ahead with your own life—leave me alone.

7. Life goes on, and so do we.
Just how we do it is no mystery.
One by one we fill the days.
We find a thousand different ways.

8. Maybe the world is blind, or just a little unkind—
Don’t know.
Seems you can’t be sure of anything anymore—
Although…
You may be lonely and then, one day you’re smiling again.
Every time I turn around,
I see the girl that turns my world around.
Standing there . . .

9. She was working in a bridal shop in Flushing, Queens,
´Til her boyfriend kicked her out in one of those crushing scenes.
What was she to do? Where was she to go? She was out on her
fanny….
(Hmmm, now what would rhyme with that?)

10. In West Philadelphia, born and raised
On the playground is where I spent most of my days.
Chillin’ out, maxin’, relaxin’ all cool,
And all shootin’ some B-ball outside of the school.
When a couple of guys who were up to no good
Started makin’ trouble in my neighborhood.
I got in one little fight, and my Mom got scared,
And said, “You’re movin’ with your aunty and uncle in Bel Air.”

(We’ll give that about a “1” on the Difficulty scale.)

11. When criminals in this world appear
And break the laws that they should fear
And frighten all who see or hear,
The cry goes up both far and near
For [name of hero]!

12. Nab him,
Jab him,
Tab him,
Grab him—
Stop that pigeon—now!

Ah, don’t you feel better about yourself now?  And, hey, we know a discount store that still has some candy left.  (I mean, all kids like licorice, right?)

Yeah, stop that pigeon. The pigeon!  And just the pigeon!  (Whew!)

Yeah, stop that pigeon. The pigeon! And just the pigeon! (Whew!)

 

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Now some wurdz for the burdz

My dear sweet wife is gradually turning our backyard into a bird hostel and spa.  And conference center.

She recently noted these tips from the National Audubon Society on how to keep your yard bird-friendly (particularly with regard to migrating birds), which we pass along to you:

IMG_2296Keep water sources in your yard for birds to drink and bathe in. (Change water at least every three days in mosquito-breeding season.)

Leave snags, brush and other places where birds can take shelter in bad weather. And multiple levels of habitat also give birds various places to nest, feed and sing.

Eliminate invasive plants, which do not provide as much food or habitat for birds as native plants do.

Close curtains and/or turn off lights at night during migrating season. Some birds navigate by the constellations, and stray bright lights can confuse them.

Also lower window blinds or place decals so that birds can see windows and won’t try to fly through them.

Keep cats inside. (Indoor cats live longer, anyway.)

Reduce use of herbicides and pesticides.

Click this for more information.

There.  Now maybe they’ll go over to your yard and defile your car.

Now… this!

Was on his way to Palm Beach but got distracted by your porch light and ended up spending the winter in Toledo.

Was on his way to Palm Beach but got distracted by your porch light and ended up spending the winter in Toledo.

Posted in Nature's wonders, Travel | Tagged , , | 2 Comments